How To Get People To Open Your Emails

How To Get People To Open Your Emails

Communication is critical to the success of any business. One of the most popular means of communication within the workplace is email. However, studies show that the average email open rate across all industries is only 20%. This staggering result can make  it incredibly difficult to effectively communicate. I mean, how can we open every single one anyway when we get just TOO many 🤷‍♀️. However, there are a few tips you can apply to help get people to open your emails despite the flooded inboxes.

Create a good subject line

This is quite obviously one of the most important factors of your email. The subject line tells the recipient what the email is about. If it is vague or poorly written, it builds no interest. One study shows that 35% of email recipients open emails based on the subject line alone. Therefore, it stands to reason that the better your subject line is, the more likely someone will open and read your email. Here are some points to  remember when writing a subject line.

  • Be precise. Keep your subject short and simple.
  • Build curiosity. Consider writing a subject that they’ll want more information on. Example: “How to hold an engaging meeting.”
  • Use emojis 😎 👇 ☀️ 👏 🙂  ☕️ ! We tend to use them more than enough, but adding at leas one in your subject line will improve open rates. Make sure the emoji is relevant to your email so you don’t run the risk of confusing your audience. Also, maybe skip them if you’re emailing about something on the serious side.

Make your emails beneficial

If you build a reputation as someone whose emails never contain pertinent information, they’ll eventually get ignored. You’ll also more than likely get the dreaded UNSUBSCRIBE button. However, if you consistently send out emails that are beneficial to the recipients they’ll be far more likely to open them. Recipients need to know that it’s helpful and on-subject to open your emails. You can get people to open your emails by including information that will help them do better at their jobs, become healthier people mentally, emotionally, and physically, or give them information that will push them forward in whatever way they need.

For instance, you could include “tips to accelerate your business”. Or, you could even take your topic and write a, “how to apply this in your workplace” section. Make your information personally beneficial in one way or another.

Present your topic, then stay on topic

Email should be easy to read. Typically you’ll communicate one main idea in each email. Be careful not to ramble or go down a rabbit trail (I see this a lot in my own inboxes) 🙄.  Stay on topic and clearly communicate pertinent information. You can more effectively accomplish this by utilizing numbers both in your email and in your subject line. Using statistics and numbered lists can help the reader follow and understand what you’re communicating easier. For example: “10 lessons I learned from my first year in management” or, “5 ways to improve company morale”. Give the reader a clear understanding of what you’re going to tell them in the email.

Write an email, not a novel

Emails should be simple and pointed. No one wants to spend 30 minutes reading through one email. When it comes to length, only make your email as long as it needs to be to effectively communicate your subject. If you struggle with keeping your emails short and simple, take the same approach as you would if writing a paper.

  • Write an outline
  • Write and intro
  • Write a conclusion
  • Fill out your outline
  • Write a title/subject line

Following this format is one of many ways that you can improve the flow and content of your emails. Outlining will help keep you on topic.

If you need help with email marketing, don’t hesitate to call us. Inque Media helps local businesses increase their digital footprint through content and advertising.

Natalie Thibault

Natalie Thibault

Owner of Inque Media

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